Early Years Foundation Stage

At St Basil's we believe that children deserve the best possible start to their learning journey in school. We are proud of our Early Years and during our recent Ofsted inspection, it was recognised that:

Reception children receive a fine start to their education. They develop good attitudes to school and learn well.

The atmosphere is stimulating and magical. Consequently, the children come happily into school and cannot wait to begin learning. 

Relationships with adults are warm and caring. It is clear from the levels of confidence and independence the children show that they feel safe.

In the Early years, we cover seven areas of learning; three Prime and four Specific Areas.

These are:

Prime Areas:

Communication and Language

Physical Development

Personal, Social and Emotional Development

Specific Areas:

Literacy Development

Mathematical Development

Understanding the World

Expressive Arts and Design

At the end of reception your child will scored as Emerging, Expected or Exceeding against the Early Learning Goal for each area. The Early Learning Goals for Mathematics and Literacy Development are:


Children count reliably with numbers from one to 20, place them in order and say which number is one more or one less than a given number. Using quantities and objects, they add and subtract two single-digit numbers and count on or back to find the answer. They solve problems, including doubling, halving and sharing.

Shape, shape and measure

Children use everyday language to talk about size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare quantities and objects and to solve problems. They recognise, create and describe patterns. They explore characteristics of everyday objects and shapes and use mathematical language to describe them.


Children read and understand simple sentences. They use phonic knowledge to decode regular words and read them aloud accurately. They also read some common irregular words. They demonstrate understanding when talking with others about what they have read.


Children use their phonic knowledge to write words in ways which match their spoken sounds. They also write some irregular common words. They write simple sentences which can be read by themselves and others. Some words are spelt correctly and others are phonetically plausible.